Them too

Re-reading the Second Wave

This year’s Second Wave class met for the first time this week, and we talked about a set of readings which discuss the origins of the US Women’s Liberation Movement. The women who formed the earliest feminist groups, beginning around 1967, had been (and in some cases remained) active in the radical social movements of the 1960s, like the Student Non-Violent Co-ordinating Committee (SNCC, a civil rights organisation) and various ‘New Left’ organisations. But women in these groups became increasingly discontented with the way their male comrades treated them.

It wasn’t just that women were excluded from leadership positions and expected to do the menial jobs. There was something else as well–something which, this week, had a very familiar ring. Robin Morgan, writing in 1970, called it out when she asked:

Was it my brother who listed human beings among the objects that would be easily available after the…

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Countering Color Revolutions: Russia’s New Security Strategy and its Implications for U.S. Policy | PONARS Eurasia

The May 2014 Moscow Conference on International Security (MCIS), sponsored by the Russian Ministry of Defense, was focused on the role of popular protest, and specifically color revolutions, in international security. The speakers, which included top Russian military and diplomatic officials such as Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu and Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, argued that color revolutions are a new form of warfare invented by Western governments seeking to remove independently-minded national governments in favor of ones controlled by the West.

Source: Countering Color Revolutions: Russia’s New Security Strategy and its Implications for U.S. Policy | PONARS Eurasia

British Children Left Unprotected By New Memorandum Of Understanding On Conversion Therapy — freer lives

The UK Council for Psychotherapy has launched a new Memorandum of Understanding on Conversion Therapy to include ‘gender identity,’ leaving therapists, counsellors, GPs and clinical professionals in a position where they may be afraid to do anything but agree with a patient’s self-diagnosis as ‘transgender.’ Anything other than ‘affirmation’ could lay a professional open to […]

via British Children Left Unprotected By New Memorandum Of Understanding On Conversion Therapy — freer lives

Francine Sporenda interviews Huschke Mau — Nordic Model Now!

Huschke Mau is a survivor of Germany’s legalized prostitution system. In this article, Francine Sporenda interviews her, focusing on the recent changes in the prostitution law in Germany and why Germany is known as the “bordello of Europe.”

via Francine Sporenda interviews Huschke Mau — Nordic Model Now!

A Deaf Ear to Dire Russian Warnings — Consortiumnews

Official Washington is so obsessed with the hyped Russia-gate allegations that it isn’t picking up on dire warnings from Russia that continued U.S. military interference in Syria won’t be tolerated, as Gilbert Doctorow notes. By Gilbert Doctorow From time to…Read more →

via A Deaf Ear to Dire Russian Warnings — Consortiumnews

Is Just Want Privacy Hiding Help from a National Extremist Organization?

Is Just Want Privacy Hiding Help from a National Extremist Organization?

A complaint filed with the PDC claims that anti-trans activists are flouting campaign disclosure rules, innocence be damned.

A complaint filed with the state Public Disclosure Commission claims that Washington’s anti-trans activists are getting outside help. ALEX GARLAND

LGBTQ advocacy group Equal Rights Washington (ERW) has filed a complaint with the state Public Disclosure Commission alleging that Just Want Privacy, the group behind proposed anti-trans ballot measure I-1515, isn’t playing by the state’s campaign disclosure rules.

According to the complaint filed on Tuesday, ERW claims that Just Want Privacy isn’t reporting help it allegedly receives from the Family Research Council, an extremist anti-LGBTQ group based in Washington, D.C. Additionally, ERW says that Just Want Privacy has failed to report in-kind contributions from Family Policy Institute of Washington staff and did not report as much as $20,000 worth of contributions on time.

“[What’s] most concerning to me is that there are outside groups contributing to the campaign that aren’t being accounted for,” Monisha Harrell, board chair of ERW, said. “It doesn’t give us an idea of who’s really funding or backing this initiative, and I think there’s significant concern that many anti-LGBT national organizations are trying to overturn our nondiscrimination laws here in Washington State.”

ERW’s evidence for outside involvement is a status update posted to Just Want Privacy’s Facebook page on June 24. “We’ve been working hard to get the word and [petition] materials to churches across the state,” the post reads. “Even the Family Research Council from Washington DC has lent a helping hand.”

But Just Want Privacy’s in-kind contributions filed to the PDC do not show any help from the Family Research Council.

The ERW complaint also claims that Just Want Privacy’s campaign finance records for the month of May don’t include wages paid to Joseph Backholm, Just Want Privacy campaign chairman and director of the Family Policy Institute of Washington, and two other Just Want Privacy staffers. The same complaint says that as much as $20,000 in contributions were reported to the PDC a month after they had been deposited.

Backholm told me that he and his team are still reviewing the allegations in the complaint. (He also asked if I would publish an update “when the PDC finds the complaints don’t merit any action.”)

Just Want Privacy has nine more days to obtain the 246,000 signatures it needs to qualify for the November ballot. At this point, Harrell, the chair of ERW, suspects they might get them.

“If I were just to look at just what’s on their PDC I would say it would be difficult,” Harrell said. “But because we believe that there’s outside assistance that’s been working on this we have not been able to fully assess their resources.